Saturday, February 09, 2013

Some Thoughts About Book-buying

For quite a large proportion of my life there have been only two ways to get hold of a book that one wanted to read, either through a library or through a book-shop, which essentially meant W. H. Smith if you lived in the sticks or maybe a second-hand book shop. No remainder book shops, no charity shops, no internet. My recent experience of reading the work of one particular author, new to me, has been a thought-provoking contrast. The first novel by Christopher Fowler that I read was THE WATER ROOM, which I bought a couple of years ago in a charity shop in Bristol, encouraged by my friend and fellow writer, Kate Ellis, who said she liked his books. I did enjoy it, but didn't seek out any more. Then a month or two ago I spotted another of his, THE VICTORIA VANISHES, in my local Oxfam shop, remembered it had a nice review in the Guardian, and bought it. This one I enjoyed a lot: it reminded me of Edmund Crispin's novels with its echo of THE MOVING TOY-SHOP and its range of eccentric characters but it also had an atmosphere all its own. I was contemplating buying another, when quite by chance I popped into a remainder book shop in Bakewell and found two more for only £2 each: BRYANT AND MAY ON THE RAILS and BRYANT AND MAY ON THE LOOSE. Both are excellent and I was hooked. By now I had four books in the series and I was feeling a bit guilty that the writer isn't benefiting more from this so I bought the next one, BRYANT AND MAY AND THE PROPERTY OF BLOOD, as an ebook from Amazon for around a fiver. However I was still feeling a bit guilty because I had resolved to cut down on purchases from tax-dodging Amazon, so for the next book I went into Waterstone's in Sheffield. I was disappointed to find they had only the books I'd already read. However the following week I found WHITE CORRIDOR in Foyles on St Pancras station and bought that. So it's only on the sixth book I actually bought a hard copy from a proper, old-fashioned bookshop. Incidentally, I'm not entirely sure, but I suspect the writer will get a better royalty from the ebook than from the paper copy. Several other thoughts occur to me. Amazon has a big advantage because it can stock so much more than a bricks and mortar bookshop and if you buy an ebooks you can have it in seconds. I don't have a bookshop within walking distance so that is a factor. Same is true of the local library, though I could have gone when I was in Bakewell. I intend to buy the other books in the series in some form that will put money in the writer's pocket, because I really like them and think it's only right. But part of the reason that I feel that way is because I am a writer, too. If I wasn't, that might not even occur to me. On the other hand, anyone might buy a book in a charity shop, reasoning that they haven't lost much if they don't like it, and then go on to buy the author's other books (or even decide to make a TV series of them - as happened with one of Anne Cleeve's books). So it's a complicated picture, though it strikes me that as more and more people buy ebooks - sales have already overtaken hard copies - there will be fewer and fewer paperbacks for charity shops or second-hand book shops. It will take a while to make an impact, but I think it must in the end. For now though it's the case that books have never been available so widely or cheaply. For the reader it is great. I am not so sure about the writer.

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